CURTIS "WALLSTREET" CAROL- EVEN THE PLAYING FIELDS

Curtis Carroll is a successful investor and informal financial advisor. He’s also an inmate in the San Quentin State Prison in Northern California, where he’s serving 54 years to life for his involvement in a robbery attempt that ended in murder.

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THE NOTORIOUS B.I.G AKA BIGGIE SMALLS- #RIP MARCH 9TH

Hip Hop music star Christopher Wallace, better known as Biggie Smalls or The Notorious B.I.G., was part of an East Coast-West Coast rapper rivalry that included Tupac Shakur and Sean “P. Diddy” Combs. A year after Shakur was murdered, Notorious B.I.G. was preparing to release his second album when he was gunned down at the age of 24 as he left a party in Los Angeles. The album soared to #1 on the charts posthumously. Notorious B.I.G. is ranked as one of the top rappers of all time.

Christopher Wallace was born in New York on May 21, 1972. His mother Voletta Wallace was a Jamaican pre-school teacher. His father Selwyn Latore was a welder and a politician. Wallace's father deserted his family leaving his mother to raise him in Brooklyn. Voletta Wallace worked two jobs to provide the income that allowed her son to attend private school as a child. Although Wallace was a good student, by the age of 12 he was dealing drugs and as a teen fell into a life of crime. He would be arrested numerous times during his short life.

Eventually Wallace attended Brooklyn’s George Westinghouse High School, and after school he jammed with jazz saxophonist Donald Harrison. Wallace dropped out of high school at 17 with aspirations of becoming a rap superstar following his idols Run-DMC and Big Daddy Kane.

Wallace initially adopted the stage name “Biggie Smalls” after a character in the 1975 movie Let’s Do It Again. Due to legal issues with the name, he later adopted a second stage name “The Notorious B.I.G.” In the 1990s Sean Combs, AKA "P. Diddy,” heard Biggie Smalls’ demo tape and quickly signed him with Uptown Records. In 1992 Combs put Smalls on the remix of Mary J. Blige’s song Real Love, giving the rapper his first national exposure. The following year Smalls’ debut single Party and Bulls**t was released. That same year Combs separated from Uptown Records to begin his own Record Label, Bad Boy Entertainment, and Wallace followed him under the name of Notorious B.I.G.

On August 4, 1994 Notorious B.I.G. married R&B singer Faith Renée Evans. The following month his first album Ready to Die was released. The album included the hit singles Juicy, Big Poppa and One More Chance, and was so successful that in 1995 Billboard Music Awards named Notorious B.I.G. “Rap Artist of the Year” while his One More Chance became “Rap Single of the Year.” His success fueled the coastal rivalry with other prominent rappers, and when Tupac Shakur was murdered in 1996, Notorious B.I.G. was implicated by the Los Angeles Times. The paper later published a retraction.

On the night of March 8, 1997, Notorious B.I.G. attended a large Las Vegas party promoting his new single Hypnotize and his new album. On the way back to the hotel from the party in the early morning of March 9, he and his entourage were attacked by unknown assailants. Notorious B.I.G. was killed by gunfire at the age of 24. He left behind his wife Faith, his three-year-old daughter T’yanna and his five-month-old son Christopher Wallace, Jr.

On March 25, 1997 Notorious B.I.G.’s second album Life After Death was released posthumously. In 2000 the album was certified Diamond in sales, meaning that it sold more than 10,000,000 copies. Life After Death was one of the few albums in any genre to hold this distinction, making it one of the highest selling hip-hop albums of all time. 

CRACKING THE CODE OF THE HUMAN GENOME

Medical researchers use laboratory-grown human cells to learn the intricacies of how cells work and test theories about the causes and treatment of diseases. The cell lines they need are “immortal”—they can grow indefinitely, be frozen for decades, divided into different batches and shared among scientists. In 1951, a scientist at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland, created the first immortal human cell line with a tissue sample taken from a young black woman with cervical cancer. Those cells, called HeLa cells, quickly became invaluable to medical research—though their donor remained a mystery for decades. In her new book, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, journalist Rebecca Skloot tracks down the story of the source of the amazing HeLa cells, Henrietta Lacks, and documents the cell line's impact on both modern medicine and the Lacks family.

Who was Henrietta Lacks?
She was a black tobacco farmer from southern Virginia who got cervical cancer when she was 30. A doctor at Johns Hopkins took a piece of her tumor without telling her and sent it down the hall to scientists there who had been trying to grow tissues in culture for decades without success. No one knows why, but her cells never died.

Why are her cells so important?
Henrietta’s cells were the first immortal human cells ever grown in culture. They were essential to developing the polio vaccine. They went up in the first space missions to see what would happen to cells in zero gravity. Many scientific landmarks since then have used her cells, including cloning, gene mapping and in vitro fertilization.

There has been a lot of confusion over the years about the source of HeLa cells. Why?
When the cells were taken, they were given the code name HeLa, for the first two letters in Henrietta and Lacks. Today, anonymizing samples is a very important part of doing research on cells. But that wasn’t something doctors worried about much in the 1950s, so they weren’t terribly careful about her identity. When some members of the press got close to finding Henrietta’s family, the researcher who’d grown the cells made up a pseudonym—Helen Lane—to throw the media off track. Other pseudonyms, like Helen Larsen, eventually showed up, too. Her real name didn’t really leak out into the world until the 1970s.

How did you first get interested in this story?
I first learned about Henrietta in 1988. I was 16 and a student in a community college biology class. Everybody learns about these cells in basic biology, but what was unique about my situation was that my teacher actually knew Henrietta’s real name and that she was black. But that’s all he knew. The moment I heard about her, I became obsessed: Did she have any kids? What do they think about part of their mother being alive all these years after she died? Years later, when I started being interested in writing, one of the first stories I imagined myself writing was hers. But it wasn’t until I went to grad school that I thought about trying to track down her family.

How did you win the trust of Henrietta’s family?
Part of it was that I just wouldn’t go away and was determined to tell the story. It took almost a year even to convince Henrietta’s daughter, Deborah, to talk to me. I knew she was desperate to learn about her mother. So when I started doing my own research, I’d tell her everything I found. I went down to Clover, Virginia, where Henrietta was raised, and tracked down her cousins, then called Deborah and left these stories about Henrietta on her voice mail. Because part of what I was trying to convey to her was I wasn’t hiding anything, that we could learn about her mother together. After a year, finally she said, fine, let’s do this thing.

When did her family find out about Henrietta’s cells?
Twenty-five years after Henrietta died, a scientist discovered that many cell cultures thought to be from other tissue types, including breast and prostate cells, were in fact HeLa cells. It turned out that HeLa cells could float on dust particles in the air and travel on unwashed hands and contaminate other cultures. It became an enormous controversy. In the midst of that, one group of scientists tracked down Henrietta’s relatives to take some samples with hopes that they could use the family’s DNA to make a map of Henrietta’s genes so they could tell which cell cultures were HeLa and which weren’t, to begin straightening out the contamination problem.

So a postdoc called Henrietta’s husband one day. But he had a third-grade education and didn’t even know what a cell was. The way he understood the phone call was: “We’ve got your wife. She’s alive in a laboratory. We’ve been doing research on her for the last 25 years. And now we have to test your kids to see if they have cancer.” Which wasn’t what the researcher said at all. The scientists didn’t know that the family didn’t understand. From that point on, though, the family got sucked into this world of research they didn’t understand, and the cells, in a sense, took over their lives.

How did they do that?
This was most true for Henrietta’s daughter. Deborah never knew her mother; she was an infant when Henrietta died. She had always wanted to know who her mother was but no one ever talked about Henrietta. So when Deborah found out that this part of her mother was still alive she became desperate to understand what that meant: Did it hurt her mother when scientists injected her cells with viruses and toxins? Had scientists cloned her mother? And could those cells help scientists tell her about her mother, like what her favorite color was and if she liked to dance.

Deborah’s brothers, though, didn’t think much about the cells until they found out there was money involved. HeLa cells were the first human biological materials ever bought and sold, which helped launch a multi-billion-dollar industry. When Deborah’s brothers found out that people were selling vials of their mother’s cells, and that the family didn’t get any of the resulting money, they got very angry. Henrietta’s family has lived in poverty most of their lives, and many of them can’t afford health insurance. One of her sons was homeless and living on the streets of Baltimore. So the family launched a campaign to get some of what they felt they were owed financially. It consumed their lives in that way.

What are the lessons from this book?
For scientists, one of the lessons is that there are human beings behind every biological sample used in the laboratory. So much of science today revolves around using human biological tissue of some kind. For scientists, cells are often just like tubes or fruit flies—they’re just inanimate tools that are always there in the lab. The people behind those samples often have their own thoughts and feelings about what should happen to their tissues, but they’re usually left out of the equation.

And for the rest of us?
The story of HeLa cells and what happened with Henrietta has often been held up as an example of a racist white scientist doing something malicious to a black woman. But that’s not accurate. The real story is much more subtle and complicated. What is very true about science is that there are human beings behind it and sometimes even with the best of intentions things go wrong.

One of the things I don’t want people to take from the story is the idea that tissue culture is bad. So much of medicine today depends on tissue culture. HIV tests, many basic drugs, all of our vaccines—we would have none of that if it wasn’t for scientists collecting cells from people and growing them. And the need for these cells is going to get greater, not less. Instead of saying we don’t want that to happen, we just need to look at how it can happen in a way that everyone is OK with.




 

Barbary Wars, 1801–1805 and 1815–1816

The Barbary States were a collection of North African states, many of which practiced state-supported piracy in order to exact tribute from weaker Atlantic powers. Morocco

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ALLISTER CROWLEY- THE WICKEST MAN IN THE WORLD ?

By the mid 1890s, the Golden Dawn was well established in Great Britain, with membership rising to over a hundred from every class of Victorian society. In its heyday, many cultural celebrities belonged to the Golden Dawn, such as actress Florence Farr and Irish revolutionary Maud Gonne (Gonne left after she converted to Roman Catholicism)

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BEHIND THE LENS OF CHI MODU: A PORTRAIT OF HIP HOP

In 1990 Chi Modu set his sights on photographing for a new Hip-Hop magazine called The Source. He explained, “I saw this thing bubbling, which was Hip-Hop.

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SILICON VALLEY'S BURGER MADE FROM PLANTS


To mimic beef fat, Impossible Foods' meat-free burger uses flecks of coconut oil that are solid at room temperature and melt when cooked.

Maggie Carson Jurow

This summer, diners in New York, San Francisco and Los Angeles will get their hands on a hamburger that has been five years in the making.

The burger looks, tastes and smells like beef — except it's made entirely from plants. It sizzles on the grill and even browns and oozes fat when it cooks. It's the brainchild of former Stanford biochemist Patrick Brown and his research team at Northern California-based Impossible Foods.

The startup's goal is like many in Silicon Valley — to create a product that will change the world.

"The demand for meat is going through the roof, and the world is not going to be able to satisfy that using animals — there's just not enough space, not enough water," says Brown, Impossible Foods' founder and CEO.

Global meat production is expected to increase by 612,000 tons, or 1 percent, this year, according to the United States Department of Agriculture.

So Impossible Foods has developed a burger that it says is less resource-intensive, healthier and will eventually be cheaper to produce than red meat.

It's not the only faux meat company selling bloody plant patties. Last month, Los Angeles-based Beyond Meat made headlines when it released the Beyond Burger, its pea protein burger that sizzles like real meat and "bleeds" beet juice. The burgers quickly sold out after debuting at a Whole Foods in Boulder, Colo.

Beyond Meat's investors include Microsoft founder Bill Gates. Gates is also backing Impossible Foods. So is billionaire venture capitalist Vinod Khosla and Google Ventures. All told, the company has raised some $182 million in seed funding. Last year, Impossible Foods turned down Google's offer to buy the company for $200 million to $300 million.

The Impossible Burger is more than just peas and carrots smashed together: It's the result of some pretty high-tech research.

Brown's team analyzes meat at a molecular level to determine what makes a burger taste, smell and cook the way it does. He wants his burgers to be squishy while raw, then firm up and brown on the grill. He believes everything from an animal's fat tissue to muscle cells can be replicated using plant compounds.

Before starting the company, Brown had a hunch that a certain ingredient made meat taste different than other foods. "I had a very strong suspicion early on that heme would be the magic ingredient for flavor," said Brown.

Heme is an iron-containing molecule in blood that carries oxygen. It's heme that makes your blood red and makes meat look pink and taste slightly metallic.

It's highly concentrated in red meat, but it can also be found in plants. And that was the trick to giving Brown's meat-free burgers that blood-pink look when raw and meaty taste once cooked.

Brown could have extracted heme from legumes like soybeans, which contain leghemoglobin in nodules on their roots. Except, that would have been expensive and time consuming, and unearthing the plants would release carbon into the atmosphere.

So, he decided to use yeast instead. By taking the soybean gene that encodes the heme protein and transferring it to yeast, the company has been able to produce vast quantities of the bloodlike compound. Each vat of frothy red liquid in the lab holds enough heme to make about 20,000 quarter-pound Impossible Burgers. "We have to be able to produce this on a gigantic scale," says Brown.

"Ultimately, we want it to be practical to produce enough of our product to match what's currently consumed in the U.S. or the world. Well, that's a lot of heme," he says.

Because Impossible Foods isn't targeting vegetarians; it wants to woo carnivores. Brown thinks meat lovers would opt for veggie patties more often if they had an option that really replicated the burger-eating experience. So he's trying to pin down what accounts for the mouthfeel of beef.

To replicate fat, researchers mix flecks of coconut oil into ground "plant meat" made from textured wheat protein and potato protein. The potato protein provides a firm exterior when the meat is seared. And the coconut oil stays solid until it hits the frying pan, where it begins to melt, just like beef fat.

The burger has more protein, less fat and fewer calories than a patty that's 80 percent lean meat and 20 percent fat. And because it's plant-based, this "meat" has no cholesterol.

The taste is unreal. When I tried a mini burger slathered in vegan mayo, mashed avocado, caramelized onions and Dijon prepared by San Francisco chef Traci Des Jardin at the company's headquarters in Redwood City, I was floored. The flavor was slightly less potent than meat, but if I didn't already know this burger was made from plants, I wouldn't have guessed it. The texture as I chewed was just like ground beef. I tried to get my hands on Beyond Meat's Beyond Burger for a comparison, but so far it's only available in Boulder.

Silicon Valley-based Impossible Foods has taken a high-tech approach to creating a plant-based burger that smells and tastes like real meat. At the company's headquarters in Redwood City, Calif., chef Traci Des Jardins served the Impossible Burger (pictured uncooked) with vegan mayo, Dijon mustard, mashed avocado, caramelized onions, chopped cornichon, tomato and lettuce on a pretzel bun

The aroma of Impossible's sizzling patty is also unmistakably meatlike. As it wafted through the office, the photographer I'd brought along for this story (a self-described cheeseburger enthusiast) cooed, "the smell!"

Brown's team engineered that smell. First, the researchers put cooked meat in a gas chromatography mass spectrometry machine, which separates thousands of compounds. Then, they sniffed the meat via a tube, so they could identify the specific individual components of that meat scent.

Brown says the researchers encountered smells like butter, maple syrup, a diaper pail, smoke, grass — even a raspberry bug. That last one was from a researcher who grew up on a raspberry farm in Vermont.

"The smell of meat is the simultaneous exposure to these hundreds of different smells, and the smell of meat happens up here," Brown says as he points to his head.

Food analyst Jeffrey Landsman says consumers love that sensory experience. "There is a real opportunity for food alternatives that taste, look and sound like the real thing and appeal to all five senses," says Landsman, a vice president at Specialty Food Sales, a company that markets and sells innovative food products to supermarkets.

He says there's definitely room on the market for both Impossible's burger and Beyond Meat's Beast Burger, which he called "a home run."

"The market has changed dramatically over the past 35 years and we've seen more and more meat substitutes," says Landsman. "Millennials especially tend to eat healthier, and in five years, they'll have families and will be the target market."

But he says neither burger-substitute-maker should necessarily count on carnivore customers to drive sales. "I don't see it as a beef-eater market. I see it as an opportunity for the vegetarian market," says Landsman.

"I don't think you're going to get people to convert over" and give up meat completely, he says.

He adds, "As long as animal proteins are available at a reasonable price, people will not fully replace their meat with a plant-based alternative."

Impossible's plant burger is still more expensive to produce than beef patties. But Brown says the goal is to increase production so the "meat" becomes less expensive than ground chuck. The company is already leasing a 66,913-square-foot manufacturing facility in Oakland to ramp up production.

It will be several years before the startup makes enough meat to supply grocery stores, so right now it's focusing on select restaurants. (Beyond Meat, by contrast, is targeting grocery store shoppers with its Beyond Burger.) Impossible Foods wouldn't disclose which restaurants or say how much it'll charge for the burger. Brown says they are hoping that skilled chefs can devise complementary flavors and help redefine what it means to order a hamburger.

"If people are going to be eating burgers in 50 years, they're not going to be made from cows," said Brown. "We're saving the burger."

MELANIA TRUMP, ACCUSED OF PLAGIRISM

Chris Christie, the New Jersey governor and former prosecutor, told NBC’s Today he could not make the case for plagiarism — “not when 93 per cent of the speech is completely different than Michelle Obama’s speech.”

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BLACK LIVES REALLY MATTER


handsup-blacklivesmatter-2.jpg

Black Lives Matter is considered a movement, not an organization. But at times, it’s just a slogan, a slogan easily appropriated by individuals whose vile taunts at protest rallies are counterproductive to efforts to rid police forces of officers whose biased and reprehensible treatment of African Americans in their custody has too often proved fatal.Black Lives Matter is considered a movement, not an organization. But at times, it’s just a slogan, a slogan easily appropriated by individuals whose vile taunts at protest rallies are counterproductive to efforts to rid police forces of officers whose biased and reprehensible treatment of African Americans in their custody has too often proved fatal.

Organizations and movements both need leaders, but that concept is shunned by Black Lives Matter adherents who want it, like the deceased Occupy movement, to be more organic. They prefer a flash-mob approach to protest, using social media to let anyone know when and where to be. But when people with Black Lives Matter posters and T-shirts show up and start shouting, “Kill the pigs,” it’s hard to deny their being in the “movement.”

That opens the door for politicians like Gov. Christie to accuse Black Lives Matter of “calling for the murder of police officers.” Former New York Mayor Rudolph Giuliani has a different attack.

 

“When you say black lives matter, that’s inherently racist,” Giuliani said. “Black lives matter. White lives matter. Asian lives matter.”

Giuliani’s seemingly earnest plea for color blindness is a sleight-of-hand trick cleverly performed to distract attention from what can be clearly seen — prison statistics and casualty lists detailing the uneven treatment of minorities by police and the criminal justice system. Makes you wonder if Christie and Giuliani would have been just as blase about black lives when the anti-lynching movement needed supporters.

San Francisco activist Alicia Garza used the expression “black lives matter” in a Facebook post after the 2013 acquittal of George Zimmerman, who shot Florida teenager Trayvon Martin. A #blacklivesmatter hashtag was created for social media. Later came posters, T-shirts, a website, and a “freedom ride” to Ferguson, Mo., to protest the 2014 police shooting of another black teenager, Michael Brown.

Black Lives Matter now claims chapters in cities across America, but instead of a leader, Garza says, the loosely termed “organization” is “leader-full,” meaning many people play leadership roles.

Having identifiable leaders who speak with authority would make it easier for Black Lives Matter to combat guilt-by-association attempts to portray it as wanting to kill cops. But its followers say that’s old-fashioned. Their muse is Ella Baker, who as the behind-the-scenes mentor to the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee in the 1960s never received the recognition given male civil rights leaders like the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

But focusing on Baker ignores that while she led from the background, SNCC also had some very visible and vocal leaders, including Stokely Carmichael, who later led the Black Panthers, and John Lewis, who with Andrew Young is today considered one of the last civil rights icons. Baker’s bigger problem in receiving the recognition she deserved was her gender. In the ’60s, women weren’t supposed to lead men. Diane Nash, another SNCC leader, is also little known today.

Patrisse Cullors, creator of the #blacklivesmatter hashtag, said in a New Yorker interview that “the consequence of focusing on a leader is that you develop a necessity for that leader to be the one who’s the spokesperson and the organizer who tells the masses where to go, rather than the masses understanding that we can catalyze a movement in our community.”

The comment suggests having a leader would be like having a monarch, which isn’t necessarily so. Many leadership structures allow more than one person to have authority. The U.S. government is one example, but perhaps not the best given the partisan gulf between its executive and legislative branches. King led the Southern Christian Leadership Conference with the aid of a cadre of confidants, including his wife, Coretta Scott King.

It’s understandable that subscribers to the Black Lives Matter philosophy don’t want a Jesse Jackson or Al Sharpton drawing more attention to themselves than to the issues they’re trying to solve. But it’s not elitist for an organization or movement to have leaders. It’s not asking too much to expect movement followers to abide by certain rules. The SCLC had rules for marchers, most important to remain nonviolent.

Black Lives Matter now claims chapters in cities across America, but instead of a leader, Garza says, the loosely termed “organization” is “leader-full,” meaning many people play leadership roles.

Having identifiable leaders who speak with authority would make it easier for Black Lives Matter to combat guilt-by-association attempts to portray it as wanting to kill cops. But its followers say that’s old-fashioned. Their muse is Ella Baker, who as the behind-the-scenes mentor to the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee in the 1960s never received the recognition given male civil rights leaders like the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

But focusing on Baker ignores that while she led from the background, SNCC also had some very visible and vocal leaders, including Stokely Carmichael, who later led the Black Panthers, and John Lewis, who with Andrew Young is today considered one of the last civil rights icons. Baker’s bigger problem in receiving the recognition she deserved was her gender. In the ’60s, women weren’t supposed to lead men. Diane Nash, another SNCC leader, is also little known today.

BlackLivesMatter-53-1.jpg

The comment suggests having a leader would be like having a monarch, which isn’t necessarily so. Many leadership structures allow more than one person to have authority. The U.S. government is one example, but perhaps not the best given the partisan gulf between its executive and legislative branches. King led the Southern Christian Leadership Conference with the aid of a cadre of confidants, including his wife, Coretta Scott King.

It’s understandable that subscribers to the Black Lives Matter philosophy don’t want a Jesse Jackson or Al Sharpton drawing more attention to themselves than to the issues they’re trying to solve. But it’s not elitist for an organization or movement to have leaders. It’s not asking too much to expect movement followers to abide by certain rules. The SCLC had rules for marchers, most important to remain nonviolent.

Patrisse Cullors, creator of the #blacklivesmatter hashtag, said in a New Yorker interview that “the consequence of focusing on a leader is that you develop a necessity for that leader to be the one who’s the spokesperson and the organizer who tells the masses where to go, rather than the masses understanding that we can catalyze a movement in our community.”

ANOTHER LOOK AT LEN BIAS AND GEMATRIA


Gematria /ɡəˈmeɪ.tri.ə/ originated as an Assyro-Babylonian-Greek system of alphanumeric code/cipher later adopted into Jewish culture that assigns numerical value to a word/name/phrase in the belief that words or phrases with identical numerical values bear some relation to each other or bear some relation to the number itself as it may apply to Nature, a person's age, the calendar year, or the like.

Similar systems, some of which were derived from or inspired by Hebrew gematria, have been used in other languages and cultures, i.e. Greek isopsephy, Arabicabjad numerals and 'Simple(6,74) English(7,74) Gematria(8,74)'.

The best-known example of Hebrew gematria is the word Chai ("alive"), which is composed of two letters that (using the assignments in the Mispar gadol table shown below) add up to 18. This has made 18 a "lucky number" among Jews, and gifts in multiples of 18 are very popular.

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ANOTHER LOOK AT PRINCE

Prince was obviously a complex man and artist. Throughout his career he kept us guessing as to whether or not he was an “Illuminati” occultist or if he was hip to the conspiracy and tried to reveal it to the masses.

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KOBE BRYANT THRU THE YEARS

Bryant is tied with Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Tim Duncan for the most All-NBA selections all time with 15.Three of his five titles came when he wore jersey No. 8, but his lone MVP season was in a No. 24 jersey.

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